“Oh god. The first paragraph is so spot on it’s almost spooky. I’ve always dreamed of being able to boot into the terminal then open web browser just when I needed.”

jesús gollonet (@jesusgollonet) jesús gollonet (@jesusgollonet)

Few minutes later…

“Convinced. I’m trying #OpenBSD as soon as I have time.”

jesús gollonet (@jesusgollonet) jesús gollonet (@jesusgollonet)

“I’ve said it before, but @mwlauthor and @romanzolotarev are the reasons I use OpenBSD”

Tom A (@hir0pr0tagonist) Tom A (@hir0pr0tagonist)

Why OpenBSD?

OpenBSD shines on servers, but if you do just basic things on your desktop computer, then you’d love OpenBSD. In my case switching from macOS was easy decision: I use my computer as an internet-enabled typewriter. All I need for my work is a web browser, terminal, and Vim.

Known issues

OpenBSD works perfectly on mainstream hardware, but it doesn’t support all the hardware. Bluetooth is not supported, at all; only few wireless chipsets are supported; 3D acceleration is supported for limited number of video cards; USB3 audio is not here yet; etc.

The most popular open source software is ported to OpenBSD, but some of the ports and packages can be outdated.

Secure, correct, reliable

OpenBSD is a relatively small system, the dead code is actively removed to reduce maintenance costs, improve quality, and minimize attack surface.

Everything I need is in the base: POSIX shell, X11, vi, tmux, httpd, smptd. There are only things I need, almost nothing else. The base is well documented, actively maintained, well integrated, nothing breaks unexpectedly.

Files are neatly organized. They are always where you expect them to be. Configuration files are clean. Defaults are sane, there is almost nothing to customize.

Easy to upgrade. If you don’t use exotic software or hardware, upgrade takes just few minutes (spent mostly on reading release notes).

Install OpenBSD


If you never tried BSD, don’t be afraid. We are here to help.
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